Climate sciences

Definition

Climate science is the study of relatively long-term weather conditions, typically spanning decades to centuries but extending to geological timescales. The discipline is primarily concerned with atmospheric properties – for example temperature and humidity – and patterns of circulation, as well as interactions with the ocean, the biosphere, and, over longer timescales, the geosphere.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Reviews |

    Assessing development challenges for fisheries-dependent countries based on analyses of interactions and trade-offs between goals focusing on food, biodiversity and climate change.

    • Julia L. Blanchard
    • , Reg A. Watson
    • , Elizabeth A. Fulton
    • , Richard S. Cottrell
    • , Kirsty L. Nash
    • , Andrea Bryndum-Buchholz
    • , Matthias Büchner
    • , David A. Carozza
    • , William W. L. Cheung
    • , Joshua Elliott
    • , Lindsay N. K. Davidson
    • , Nicholas K. Dulvy
    • , John P. Dunne
    • , Tyler D. Eddy
    • , Eric Galbraith
    • , Heike K. Lotze
    • , Olivier Maury
    • , Christoph Müller
    • , Derek P. Tittensor
    •  & Simon Jennings
  • Research |

    The Martian atmosphere hosts water-ice clouds, but it is thought that any snow precipitation settles slowly, rather than in storms. Martian meteorology simulations suggest that localized convective snowstorms can occur on Mars during the night.

    • Aymeric Spiga
    • , David P. Hinson
    • , Jean-Baptiste Madeleine
    • , Thomas Navarro
    • , Ehouarn Millour
    • , François Forget
    •  & Franck Montmessin
  • Research |

    Estimates of the carbon content of Earth’s mantle and magmas vary. Analysis and modelling of gas emissions at Hawai‘i indicate that the amount of carbon in the Hawaiian mantle plume and CO2 in Hawaiian lavas is 40% greater than previously thought.

    • Kyle R. Anderson
    •  & Michael P. Poland
  • Research |

    The East Antarctic ice sheet was larger than present during past cold periods. Seafloor geophysical data show that in the Ross Sea, the extended ice sheet was underlain by an active hydrologic system during the glacial termination.

    • Lauren M. Simkins
    • , John B. Anderson
    • , Sarah L. Greenwood
    • , Helge M. Gonnermann
    • , Lindsay O. Prothro
    • , Anna Ruth W. Halberstadt
    • , Leigh A. Stearns
    • , David Pollard
    •  & Robert M. DeConto

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